All Conditions



Arthritis


Arthritis refers to inflammation of a joint and/or joint pain. There are many different types of arthritis and, over time, the symptoms may become more and more severe, leading to loss of range of motion and/or inability of the joint to support weight.

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Ankylosing spondylitis


Ankylosing spondylitis is inflammatory (auto-immume) arthritis of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. It often starts as a dull pain in the lower back or buttocks that is improved with activity. As the disease progresses, patients lose range of motion in the spine, leading to more severe stiffness and pain. Ankylosing spondylitis has a very strong genetic component (90+% have the HLA-B27 genotype) and is more common in men than women.

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Bicipital Tendonitis


Bicipital tendonitis is inflammation of the biceps tendon (long head), which is seen at the bicipital groove at the humeral head. This is an inflammatory condition that results in limited shoulder position and function secondary to pain.

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CRPS/RSD


Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic, evolving, painful and progressive condition that affects the distal extremities often following a traumatic injury.

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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome


Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) describes a common nerve entrapment at the wrist involving the median nerve that may cause pain, numbness, and even weakness in the hand and wrist. Also the pain caused by carpal tunnel syndrome may radiate down to the fingers or even up into the forearm. The carpal tunnel describes a ‘tunnel’ or conduit created by the bones of the wrist and the flexor retinaculum (overlying sheath) by which tendons and nerves, etc. pass thus limiting their space.

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Cervical Disc Herniations


Disc degeneration or acute injury can cause the nucleus to herniate into the spinal canal or the neural foramen.

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Coccyx Pain


The coccyx is the end of the spine, just below the sacrum. The human coccyx is often considered a vestigial remnant or corollary of a tail; thus, the coccyx is referred to as the tailbone. Coccyx pain or coccydynia is pain at the tailbone.

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Compression Fracture


When a bone in the spine collapses, it is called a vertebral compression fracture. These fractures happen most commonly in the lower thoracic and lumbar spine.

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Cubital Tunnel Syndrome


Cubital tunnel syndrome is otherwise known as ulnar nerve entrapment or stretching/pinching at the elbow. This syndrome may be caused by direct trauma to the ulnar nerve as it passes through the tunnel or via repetitive elbow motion. This syndrome causes pain and numbness and tingling down the forearm into the 4th and 5th fingers (ring and little finger).

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Endometriosis Related Pain


Endometriosis is abnormal growth of endometrial tissue outside of the uterus. The inner lining of the uterus is called the endometrium and is composed of endometrial tissue. When this tissue is found outside of the uterus, it is called endometriosis. Endometriosis is most commonly found on other organs of the pelvis.

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Frozen Shoulder/Adhesive Capsulitis


Adhesive Capsulitis is a condition that results in painful shoulder with restricted range of motion. This is a rather common syndrome that develops in individuals as a result of prolonged immobility. It is characterized by profound loss of range of motion actively and passively in the shoulder joint. Generally, it is seen in the age group of 40-60 years of age, and more commonly in females.

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Greater Trochanteric Bursitis


Trochanteric bursitis is a common pain condition that frequently presents as pain in the lateral hip and may radiate down the leg (mimicking sciatica). The trochanteric bursa lies between the greater trochanter and the tendon of the gluteus medius and the iliotibial tract. Pain is distinct and well localized to the area over the trochanter. Trochanteric bursitis may be hallmarked by an inability to sleep on the side of the affected hip.

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Headaches & Migraines


Headaches are among the most common reasons for a medical visit. 90% of people experience at least 1 headache per year and it is estimated that at least 45 million Americans suffer from chronic headaches. You should make an appointment to see your doctor if you are experiencing more than 1 or 2 headaches per month or if you have any of the warning signs listed below.

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IT Band Pain


Iliotibial band (ITB) pain syndrome is an overuse injury involving the connective tissue that are located on the outer part of the thigh and knee. The iliotibial band (IT band) is a thick band that originates at the iliac crest and runs in the outer portion of thigh and crosses the knee and attaches to the top part of the shin bone (tibia).

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Interstitial Cystitis Related Pain


Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that results in recurring discomfort or pain in the bladder and the surrounding pelvic region. Because the most prevalent symptom of IC is bladder pain, it is often referred to as painful bladder syndrome (PBS).

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Joint Pain


Joints are ubiquitous in the human body as they are involved in movement of the spine and extremity. Joints play a crucial role in the kinematics of the human body as they are involved with movement and also help in unloading sheer pressure and weight of the body.

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Lumbar Disc Herniation


Disc degeneration or acute injury can cause the nucleus to herniate into the spinal canal or the neural foramen.

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Lumbar Muscle Spasms


Muscle spasms are painful, involuntary skeletal muscle contractions associated with abnormal electrical activity.

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Lumbar Radiculopathy


Radiculopathy is dysfunction of a spinal nerve root (or roots) that results in pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in either your arm or leg depending on which nerve root(s) are involved. When radiculopathy is present in the lumbar nerve roots, it produces sciatica; in the cervical nerve roots, it produces pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the shoulder, arm, wrist, and hands.

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Medial and Lateral Epicondylitis


Medial epicondylitis, also known as golfer’s elbow or Little Leaguer’s elbow (children) is caused by repetitive micro-trauma to the flexor tendons of the forearm. Tennis elbow also known as lateral epicondylitis, is caused by repetitive micro-trauma to the extensor tendons of the forearm. Generally, this condition is caused by repetitive activities that include hand grasping or high torque wrist turning which place pressure on the extensor tendons.

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Muscle Spasms


Muscle spasms are painful, involuntary skeletal muscle contractions associated with abnormal electrical activity.

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Osteoarthritis and Lumbar Facet Arthritis


Osteoarthritis is the most common form and is due to the normal “wear-and-tear” of the joint due to our daily activities. Over time, normal use of our joints causes the cartilage at the end of the bone to wear down (like the wearing down of the tread on your tires). As the cartilage wears away, there is more friction, which leads to inflammation. Eventually, the cartilage can completely wear away, leading to “bone-on-bone” conditions, which can be extremely painful.

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Patellar Tendonitis


Patellar tendonitis or “jumper’s knee” is an injury to the tendon which connects the knee cap (patella) to the shin. This is considered an overuse syndrome of the patellofemoral extensor unit. The most common site of involvement of in the inferior pole of the patella. The patella tendon works with the quadriceps to help extend the knee, jump, kick and run. This is a common injury in athletes involved in sports that require frequent jumping like basketball and volleyball.

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Patellofemoral Syndrome


Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) also known as runner’s knees or biker’s knee is the most common cause of anterior knee pain syndrome. This syndrome is due to an overuse injury caused by repeated insults and micro-trauma which leads to softening of the cartilage under the kneecap (patella). The pain tends to worsen when you are active or sit for prolonged periods of time and can affect one or both knees.

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Peripheral Neuropathy


Peripheral neuropathy refers to damage of smaller nerves in the extremities and often presents with pain, numbness, and burning in the feet and hands.

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Piriformis Pain


Piriformis syndrome is a condition in which the piriformis muscle, located in the buttock region, spasms and causes buttock pain. The piriformis muscle can also irritate the nearby sciatic nerve and cause pain, numbness and tingling along the back of the leg and into the foot.

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Post Laminectomy/Failed Back Surgery Syndrome


Lumbar post-laminectomy syndrome (failed back surgery syndrome) means that a patient continues to experience significant pain after they have had a spine surgery.

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Posterior Element Pain


The interspinous ligaments of the lower cervical and upper thoracic spine and their associated muscles are susceptible to the development to the development of acute and chronic pain symptomatology following overuse. It is thought that bursitis is responsible for this pain syndrome.

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RADICULOPATHY


Radiculopathy is dysfunction of a spinal nerve root (or roots) that results in pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in either your arm or leg depending on which nerve root(s) are involved. When radiculopathy is present in the lumbar nerve roots, it produces sciatica; in the cervical nerve roots, it produces pain, numbness, tingling, and weakness in the shoulder, arm, wrist, and hands.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis


Rheumatoid arthritis is a form of arthritis where the body’s own immune system attacks the capsule around the joint. This results in severe inflammation of the joint, with the joint often becoming swollen, warm, stiff, and painful. Unlike osteoarthritis, gentle movement often improves the pain in mild cases of rheumatoid arthritis.

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Shingles


Shingles usually starts with itching, tingling, and pain on one side of the body. It most often occurs in the trunk, but may affect the leg or even the face. A very typical blistering rash forms on the skin in the same region 1 to 5 days after the initial symptoms (itching, tingling, pain). The rash will then scab over in about a week and clear up in 2-4 weeks.

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Spinal Compression Fractures


When a bone in the spine collapses, it is called a vertebral compression fracture. These fractures happen most commonly in the lower thoracic and lumbar spine.

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TMJ Pain


Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) syndrome is pain in the jaw joint that can cause head and neck pain, facial pain, ear pain, and headaches. TMJ syndrome can also cause a jaw that is locked in position or difficult to open, problems with biting, and jaw clicking or popping sounds.

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Trigeminal Neuralgia


Trigeminal neuralgia is pain caused by the trigeminal nerve, which is the nerve that carries sensation from your face to your brain.

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